March 31, 2021 < Back to blog menu

A WILSON MORGAN GUIDE

Internment of Ashes

The interment of ashes is a process that takes place following a cremation. This involves the burial of cremation ashes in a permanent location, often with a small service taking place to mark the burial. This is something many families choose to do instead of scattering a loved one’s ashes, as it allows people to visit the burial site in the same way they would visit a traditional grave.

 

The overall cost for interring ashes can vary significantly depending on where you choose the burial plot to be.

There are many options for how to bury ashes, but it is important to consider the restrictions surrounding the different possibilities before making any decisions.

 

Cemetery

Most cemeteries have a dedicated section for the burial of cremation ashes. These are often Gardens of Remembrance, where the burial spot can be marked with a shrub or a tree. To do this, you will need to contact the local authority in charge of your chosen cemetery to purchase the lease to a burial plot. This is often for a period of around 75 years, and will likely have certain conditions attached to the lease.

 

Specific guidelines need to be followed for ashes internment, which varies from cemetery to cemetery. The internment of the ashes can be carried out without the family present, or you can arrange for a committal ceremony to take place. There are a large number of cemeteries in South Wales that contain a Garden of Remembrance, including a number of cemeteries in Cardiff and Penarth.

 

Churchyard

To inter ashes in a churchyard, you will be required to follow the procedures of your chosen church. It is a very similar process as with a cemetery; however you will need to fill out a burial plot application form and you will likely be required to have a full ceremony carried out by the minister. Many local Churchyards in Penarth and Cardiff offer spaces for the burial of ashes.

 

Natural Burial Ground

There are many natural burial ground sites across the UK. This is an environmentally friendly option for the interment of ashes, as only biodegradable urns are permitted in natural burial areas such as woodlands.

 

Headstones are usually not allowed in a natural burial site, but flowers, trees or shrubs can be used to mark the burial spot. Sites including Thornhill Cemetery and Coedarhydyglyn Park in Cardiff contain natural burial grounds that are designated for the internment of ashes.

 

Private Land

In the UK, the interment of ashes can be legally carried out on any private land with the landowner’s permission. Many people consider burying ashes on their own land, for example in a garden, but it is important to remember that future owners of this land can prohibit any visitation to the burial site. To bury cremation ashes in a private garden, you will need to fill in a Certificate for Burial or Cremation, and the landowner is required to prepare and safely store a Burial Register.

 

 

 

Columbarium

A columbarium is a room, wall or building where cremation urns are stored. This an above-ground interment solution and is often chosen due to faith. They are often found in cemeteries across the UK.

 

There are many alternatives to interment, including the scattering of ashes, retaining ashes in an urn and creating a bespoke keepsake with cremation jewellery.

Here at Wilson Morgan, our expert family advisors are on hand to offer any advice and guidance you may need regarding the interment of ashes in South Wales. We can help you to find the perfect place for a loved one’s ashes to be buried, using our expert knowledge of burial sites in Penarth and the surrounding areas.

Contact us today to find out more.